Bill Pranty

Unido: 05.jul.2020 Última actividad: 27.oct.2021 iNaturalist

Hola! I am a recently active member of iNaturalist. Prior to two months ago, I had not used iNat at all; now I spend more time here than on eBird! My primary purpose here was to eliminate as much of the backlog of >9,000 bird observations from Florida as possible. It took me about two months to review everything, with >7,300 definitive identifications offered. It was especially gratifying to move into Research Grade sightings that had been in limbo for 2-3 years -- and some IDs were exasperatingly simple (e.g., adult Common Gallinule, male Northern Cardinal).

My eBird profile is https://ebird.org/profile/Mjk2MzM1/US-FL

My medium-term goal (i.e, by Apr 2023) on iNat is to achieve 1,000 species in Florida. Since I have photographed or audio-/video-recorded 503 species of birds (none of them captive), then I need 497 non-avian species.

Not that this means THAT MUCH, but to date (Oct 2021), I have uploaded more than 30,200 photographs and audio-/video-recording of Florida birds to eBird, encompassing more than 10,000 checklists. I have observed 530 species of birds in Florida (more than any other eBirder) and have photographed or audio-/video-recorded 503 of these (also more than any other eBirder). I'll predict that I am 99.7% correct in the bird identifications I offer to others on iNat -- dowitchers, large white-headed gulls, and Empidonax flycatchers trip me up occasionally. Unless a photograph is horrific, I attempt to identify every bird submitted to iNat from Florida (unless others beat me to it). I take a particular interest in exotic (non-native) species, since most birders shun them like the plague.

I will continue to use eBird primarily for my bird data, and I hope to increasingly use iNaturalist to document all other flora and fauna (I occasionally post birds records to iNat but will never have the time to post all my bird data, a process that would take many years). I give MEGA KUDOS to iNat for using community review and correction for misidentifications. eBird's lack of such review severely reduces its value, IMHO. Perhaps some day, eBird will allow community review as its primary means of data validation; its current "local reviewer" technique is clunky, often slower than molasses, and requires the eBirder to agree to correct his/her misidentifications; otherwise, they remain on the checklist indefinitely.

Before I begin in detail, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE CROP YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS! Yes, it can be fun playing the "where the eff is the bird?" game, but overall scrolling around a photograph to find the bird is time-consuming -- and I will oftem move on from your observation without offering an identification.

After having examined >30,000 bird records from Florida on iNaturalist over the past 5 months, I'll make some general, then specific, comments. I had to blow off a few thousand records for various reasons, which I will detail here in the hope that such issues can be minimized in the future:

Before I begin, I APOLOGIZE for using ALL CAPS at times to point out something important that I do not want overlooked. Also, I apologize if any part of this profile sounds arrogant or preachy; I am neither.

1) Some photos are appallingly awful, with ID to "bird" even questionable. IMHO, these reports should be removed from iNat since they will never be identified to any appreciable extent.

2) Ditto footprints in the sand or mud, or random pellets.

3) Ditto many bird feathers. I am impressed with karakaxa's ability to identify feathers from a different hemisphere. But photos of downy body feathers are as useless as poor photographs and/or random footprints. Eggs can often be identified, but random white eggshells found on the ground aren't very helpful (other than probably coming from a dove nest). A few bird species build nests that can be identified specifically, but stick nests in trees, as photographed from the ground, aren't very helpful either.

Most of the reasonably identifiable birds that I had to blow off fall into three groups, which I will discuss next:

A) DUCKS. Mottled Ducks once were a widespread permanent, breeding resident over all but the northern parts of the Florida peninsula. "Wild" Mallards are uncommon to rare winter residents in parts of the Panhandle and extreme northern peninsula, with rare records farther south. Domestic or feral Mallards are common to abundant permanent, breeding residents wherever there are people. Mottled Ducks and Mallards have been interbreeding for decades to the point where Mottled Ducks have been extirpated from some parts of their Florida range, and where the long-term survival of the species in the state truly is doubtful. The progeny of first generation interbreeding individuals are called hybrids; all successive generations of progeny are properly called back-crosses. Since interbreeding has been occurring for so long, then I exclusively use the term back-cross rather than hybrid. Back-crosses run the gamut from looking 99% Mottled Duck-like to looking 99% Mallard-like, but most individuals can be identified as such by looking at a suite of field marks.

Mallards or Mottled Ducks that do not show definitive characteristics of either species are colloquially termed "Muddled Ducks," since their identification with certainty is not possible.

Because of the degree of interbreeding that has been occurring for so long in Florida, MOST "Mottled Ducks" identified on iNat -- and also reported on eBird checklists -- are misidentified "Muddled Ducks" -- I will guess that the percentage of misidentified Florida Mottled Ducks in iNat and eBird aproaches or exceeds 80%. Many of these will be back-crosses, but some are "pure" (albeit domestic) Mallards, and many others cannot be identified with certainty. If you think you have photographed a Mottled Duck in Florida, you probably have instead photographed a "Muddled Duck." While "Muddled Ducks" are most abundant in highly urbanized areas -- there are believed to be no "pure" Mottled Ducks left in the greater St. Petersburg area, for instance -- back-crosses can be found even in rural areas, because both species and their back-crossed progeny move around somewhat.

Because misidentifications of Mottled Ducks on iNat are frequent (although jsulzman, fogartyf, I, and a few others and are cleaning up most of the obvious errors), I will post the link to an article that Tony Leukering and I wrote for eBird discussing "Muddled Ducks" in Florida (please regard the ID pointers found in this article as works in progress subject to refinement/correction):

https://ebird.org/news/201502mudu/

Rather than using the clunky "Mallards, Pintails, and Allies" listing for unidentifiable Mallard/Mottled Ducks, I suggest that iNat create and recommend the "Mallard/Mottled Duck" listing.

Oh, and before I leave the subject of Muddled Ducks, PLEASE CEASE CLAIMING PACIFIC DUCKS IN FLORIDA! They have no chance of ever appearing in Florida (unless deliberately released). Also, USE CARE IN CLAIMING AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS in the peninsula -- especially during summer! While small numbers of American Black Ducks winter at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Wakulla County (and probably at a few other sites in the Panhandle), they are QUITE RARE in the peninsula.

B) CROWS. Gawd! First off, anybody who oversimplifies crow ID by claiming that "caw" is American Crow and "uh-uh" is Fish Crow should be banned for life from commenting on crows. American & Fish Crow vocalizations are MUCH MORE COMPLEX than this! Juvenile Fish Crows give a hoarse "car-car-car" or "car-car-car-car-car" call that even most birders misidentify as an American Crow. And some American Crow calls are almost unworldly:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S47873751
https://ebird.org/checklist/S94088115

Also, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE STOP claiming that the two crow species cannot be identified by range in Florida! In many cases, habitat and behavior -- mainly flight dynamics -- can go a long way to identify silent crows throughout the state. The distinctive "rowing" flight behavior of American Crows is well-known and easily observed. However, in some areas of Florida, RANGE ALONE CAN BE DEFINITIVE for crow identification -- at least within the 95% confidence interval on which science is based. For whatever reason, the crows along the main park road through Everglades National Park (State Road 9336) are American Crows. There are no Fish Crows here. The crows along Tamiami Trail through Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, and Everglades National Park are also safely assignable to American Crow -- ESPECIALLY if you see the crow loafing in a cypress or feeding on road kill and then hopping away from approaching traffic. (Ditto the crows along the main road through Myakka River State Park). Conversely, some mega-urbanized cities completely lack American Crows. Two examples: Pinellas County away from Brooker Creek Preserve and Miami-Dade County east of where -- Interstate 95? Florida's Turnpike? -- contain nothing but Fish Crows. ESPECIALLY if you see overhead flocks of dozens to hundreds of individuals flying to roost; American Crows do not flock in Florida the way they do "up north."

I agree that in many areas of Florida, silent, perched crows -- such as those submitted to iNat daily -- cannot be identified to species. (And let me reiterate what others have been stating on iNat for years: THERE ARE NO RAVENS IN FLORIDA; THEY'RE ALL CROWS -- unless they're misidentified Boat-tailed Grackles).

For all these, 1000+ records in iNat of "Crows and Ravens," I recommend a new listing of "American/Fish Crow," to which all existing and future records be dumped to get them out of the review queue -- and to remove the suggestion that ravens occur in Florida.

Accuracy Disclaimer #1: There are two records of escaped/released African White-necked Raven in Florida, but these are not in iNat, so ravens in Florida can be discounted. There are at least two pairs/family units/populations of House Crows in Florida (despite some claimants on iNat to the contrary) but these should not pose identification issues since few non-eBirders know about them, and since the vocalizations are distinctive (although House Crow x Fish Crow hybrids in Florida have been recorded).

https://ebird.org/checklist/S33555469

Accuracy Disclaimer #2: There are also random records from Florida of other crow species, such as Pied Crow, but I won't mention these here in detail to avoid unnecessary confusion.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S57524763

C) GRACKLES. Much of the confusion between Boat-tailed and Common grackles has been cleared up, but if a grackle has white irides (the plural of iris), then it is a Common Grackle UNLESS it was seen along the extreme western Panhandle coast or along the Atlantic coast south to around St. Augustine, where different races (alabamensis and torreyi, respectively) of the Boat-tailed Grackle occur, and these birds have white irides as adults. Long story short: ANY GRACKLE in the peninsula away the northern Atlantic coast with white irides is a Common Grackle.

D) iNat's artificial intelligence identification bot uses "White and Scarlet ibises" for every White Ibis in Florida. Since Scarlet Ibises do not exist in Florida -- except as escapees, and that's at least 15 years ago -- then please use White Ibis; there's a 99.99999% chance you will be right.

OK, now that I have dealt with these frustrating iNat issues, I'll continue my profile:

I was interested in birds by age 8 and my fascination with them has increased with time. Moving to Florida from my native Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in January 1978 really sealed the deal, since the diversity of birds in Florida is massive. Being uncomfortable with simply claiming that I saw something, I purchased my first camera in 1981 and have gone through 15 or so camera setups since then. Currently, I'm using a Panasonic Lumix FZ80 (my third over the past four years), which is lightweight, has exceptional zoom capabilities (60x!), and captures 4K video. I consider my Lumix to be as indispensable as my binocular (a Zeiss 8, x 20 Victory Compact).

For years, I resisted eBird, which I regarded as simply being free listing software provided by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. When eBird, in 2015, allowed photographs and audio recordings -- and recently for some of us, video recordings -- to be uploaded to individual checklists, thereby truly contributing to ornithology, I decided to take the plunge. And what a plunge it has been ...

Pet peeve disclaimer: NEVER, EVER use the term "CITIZEN SCIENTIST" in my presence. (What is next -- CITIZEN BRAIN SURGEON? "Yeah, I've always been interested in brain surgery -- let me get my drill bits and hacksaw blades so that I can operate on your three-year-old daughter.").

I have worked as a Research Assistant (or a similar title) on several bird studies in Florida, such as Hairy Woodpeckers and Florida Scrub-Jays for Archbold Biological Station, Florida Grasshopper Sparrows and Painted Buntings for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, a grassland bird study for the University of Florida, and two pesticide studies on birds inhabiting citrus groves on Merritt Island and golf courses in Tallahassee for the Mobay Corporation. I have also helped with Red-cockaded Woodpecker studies, and sparrow banding projects in upland grasslands in Weekiwachee Preserve (Hernando County) and in salt marshes at Shell Key Preserve (Pinellas County). During past decades, I coordinated two multi-year statewide bird projects for an environmental non-profit that does not deserve mention by name here. Outside of my professional work, I bird as much as I can, mostly with Valeri Ponzo (anibirdbrain on iNat) and Don Fraser (dmfraser on iNat). Val and Don are obsessed with winged creatures other than birds, but other than hairstreaks (which I admit are very cool), I don't really look at them, since it distracts me from birding.

I was a reader growing up, not a writer, so I'm not sure where the writing bug came from. But since the early 1990s, I have published a few hundred notes and articles, mostly in "Florida Field Naturalist" (the journal of the Florida Ornithological Society), and in "Birding" and "North American Birds" (the magazine and journal, respectively, of the American Birding Association). Birders can -- and many do! -- claim whatever rare birds they want to see, but documenting rarities with photographs or recordings and then publishing details about them in ornithological journals is what motivates me. Life lists die with you, but publications will live on.

Hopefully this won't seem bragging, but I'll paste below some of my publications. I'll limit myself to books, book chapters, peer-reviewed note and papers, and a few other publications that I am proud of. I don't see a need to list here every book review, newsletter blurb, website blurb, or compiled checklist that I have written over the years.

BOOKS

Greenlaw, Jon S., Bill Pranty, and Reed Bowman. 2014. The Robertson and Woolfenden Florida Bird Species: An Annotated List. Special Publication No. 8. Florida Ornithological Society. Gainesville, Florida. viii + 435 pages.

Pranty, Bill. 2014. American Birding Association Field Guide to Birds of Florida. Scott and Nix. New York, New York. xliv + 340 pages.

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Steven C. Heinl, Andrew W. Kratter, Paul E. Lehman, Mark W. Lockwood, Bruce Mactavish, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2008. ABA Checklist: Birds of the Continental United States and Canada, seventh edition. American Birding Association. Colorado Springs, Colorado. v + 203 pages.

Pranty, Bill, and Kurt Radamaker. 2006. Birds of Florida. Lone Pine Publishing. Edmonton, Canada. 384 pages.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. A Birder’s Guide to Florida, 5th edition. American Birding Association. Colorado Springs, Colorado. xiii + 418 pages.

Pranty, Bill. 1996. A Birder’s Guide to Florida, 4th edition. American Birding Association. Colorado Springs, Colorado. xii + 388 pages.

BOOK CHAPTERS or BOOK-LENGTH MANUSCRIPTS

Pranty, Bill and Corey T. Callaghan. 2020. Grey-headed Swamphen (Porphyrio poliocephalus Latham, 1801). Chapter 32 (Pages 243–247) in Invasive Birds: Global Trends and Impacts (C.T. Downs and L.A. Hart, editors). Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International, Wallingford, UK.

Pranty, Bill. 2010. The Important Bird Areas of Florida. Intended as Special Publication No. 8. Florida Ornithological Society. Gainesville, Florida. Unpublished.

Pranty, Bill. 2009. Anis. Pages 327 and 714 in Birds of North America. DK Publishing. New York, New York.

Pranty, Bill. 2009. Parakeets and Parrots. Pages 319–322 and 713–714 in Birds of North America. DK Publishing. New York, New York.

Pranty, Bill, and James W. Tucker, Jr. 2006. Ecology and management of the Florida Grasshopper Sparrow. Pages 188–200 in Land of Fire and Water: The Florida Dry Prairie Ecosystem. Proceedings of the Florida Dry Prairie Conference (Reed F. Noss, editor). www.ces.fau.edu/fdpc/proceedings/3-17145_p.18800_Pran_FDPC_.pdf.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. Estrildid finches. Page 645 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. Weavers. Page 644 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. Bulbuls. Page 464 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. Parakeets, macaws, and parrots. Pages 307–313 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. Limpkins. Page 171 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. Flamingos. Pages 128–129 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill. 2005. Storks. Pages 125–126 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill, and Kurt Radamaker. 2005. Ibises and spoonbills. Pages 121–124 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Pranty, Bill, and Kurt Radamaker. 2005. Bitterns, herons, and allies. Pages 110–121 in Complete Birds of North America (Jonathan Alderfer, editor). National Geographic Society. Washington, D.C.

Stith, Bradley M., John W. Fitzpatrick, Glen E. Woolfenden, and Bill Pranty. 1996. Classification and Conservation of Metapopulations: A Case Study of the Florida Scrub Jay. Pages 187–215 in Metapopulations and Wildlife Conservation (Dale R. McCullough, editor). Island Press. Covelo, California.

Kale, Herbert W., II, Bill Pranty, Bradley M. Stith, and C. Wesley Biggs. 1992. The Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Florida. Florida Audubon Society. Maitland, Florida. Final report to Nongame Wildlife Program, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. Tallahassee, Florida. Unpublished, but found online at . 323 pages.

PEER-REVIEWED PAPERS

Pranty, Bill and Valeri Ponzo. 2021. Record of a Red-rumped Agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 49:11–12.

Pranty, Bill and Alex Lamoreaux. 2020. First records of the “Prairie” Merlin (Falco columbarius richardsonii) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 48:167–170.

Pranty, Bill, Smith Juan, and Don Fraser. 2020. First winter record in Florida of the Buff-breasted Sandpiper (Calidris subruficollis). Florida Field Naturalist 48:99–101. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN%2048.3%20pages%2099-101.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Don Fraser, and Valeri Ponzo. 2020. Records of the “Western Flycatcher” in Florida, with emphasis on a vocal individual that uttered call-notes consistent with Pacific-slope Flycatcher. Florida Field Naturalist 48:90–98. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN%2048.3%20pages%2090-98.pdf

Pranty, Bill and Valeri Ponzo. 2020. Inland breeding of Gray Kingbirds (Tyrannus dominicensis) in Hendry County, Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 48:63–64. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN%2048.2%20pages%2063-64.pdf

Pranty, Bill and Michael Brothers. 2020. Extralimital occurrences of pale-eyed Boat-tailed Grackles (Quiscalus major) in central Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 48:14–18. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN%2048.1%20pages%2014-18.pdf

Pranty, Bill and Valeri Ponzo. 2020. First winter record in Florida of the Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera). Florida Field Naturalist 48:8–11. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN%2048.1%20pages%208-11.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2018. Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) in Pasco County, Florida: First record for the peninsula. Florida Field Naturalist 46:70–72. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/3.PRANTYR-N_GREBEFFN_46_3.pdf

Pranty, Bill and Valeri Ponzo. 2017. Eleven additions to the exotic avifauna of Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 45:103–109. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/2.PRANTYNEW_EXOTICSFFN_45_4.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Andrew W. Kratter, and Valeri Ponzo. 2016. Status and distribution in Florida of Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) and Couch’s Kingbird (Tyrannus couchii). Florida Field Naturalist 44:83–105. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/2.%20PRANTY%2C%20KINGBIRDS%2C%20FFN%2044%283%29.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2015. The disappearance of the Budgerigar from the ABA Area. Birding 47(4):34–40.

Pranty, Bill and Valeri Ponzo. 2015. Records of the Pin-tailed Whydah (Vidua macroura) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 43:160–166. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/4.%20PRANTY%2C%20WHYDAHS%2C%20FFN%2043%284%29.pdf

Pranty, Bill, David Gagne, and Gail A. Deterra. 2015. Oregon Junco (Junco hyemalis oreganus group) in Pasco County: First Florida record, and first summer record of any junco in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 43:173–178. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/6.%20PRANTY%2C%20JUNCO%2C%20FFN%2043%284%29.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2015. Extirpation of the Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) from Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 43:105–113. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/2.%20PRANTY%2C%20BUDGERIGARS%2C%20FFN%2043%283%29.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Valeri Ponzo. 2014. Status and distribution of Egyptian Geese (Alopochen aegyptiaca) in southeastern Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 42(3):91–107. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_42-3p91-107.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Valeri Ponzo. 2013. First winter records in Florida of Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) and Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea). Florida Field Naturalist 41(3):83–85. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_41-3p83-85.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2013. Introducing the Purple Swamphen: Management, taxonomy, and natural history. Birding 45(3):38–45.

Greenlaw, Jon S., Reed Bowman, and Bill Pranty. 2013. Assessment of European Turtle-Dove (Streptopelia turtur) on the Florida birdlist. Florida Field Naturalist 41(1):1–8. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_41-1p1-8.pdf

Delany, Michael F., Bill Pranty, and Richard A. Kiltie. 2013. Painted Bunting abundance and habitat use in Florida. Southeastern Naturalist 12(1):61–72.

Pranty, Bill, and Valeri Ponzo. 2012. First winter records in Florida of Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor), Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota), Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus), and Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), and first recent winter record of Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis). Florida Field Naturalist 40(2):41–46. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_40-2p41-46%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2012. Population growth, spread, and persistence of Purple Swamphens (Porphyrio porphyrio) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 40(1):1–12. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_40-1p1-12%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Helen W. Lovell. 2011. An addition to Florida’s exotic avifauna: Sun Parakeets (Aratinga solstitialis) in Pasco County. Florida Field Naturalist 39(4):126–133. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/4.%20PRANTY%20AND%20LOVELL-WAYNE%2C%20SUN%20PARAKEETS%2C%20FFN%2039%284%29.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Ed Kwater, and David Gagne. 2011. Kelp Gull (Larus dominicanus) in Pasco County: First record for Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 39(4):116–125. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/3.%20PRANTY%20ET%20AL%2C%20KELP%20GULL%2C%20FFN%2039%284%29.pdf

Pranty Bill, and Kimball L. Garrett. 2011. Under the radar: Non-countable birds in the ABA Area. Birding 43(5):46–58.

Pranty, Bill, and Helen W. Lovell. 2011. Presumed or confirmed nesting attempts by Black-hooded Parakeets (Nandayus nenday) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 39(3):75–85. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_39-3p75-85%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Carlos Sanchez. 2011. A recent winter record of Swainson’s Thrush (Catharus ustulatus) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 39(1):21–23. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_39-1p21-23%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2010. Status and current range of Red-whiskered Bulbuls (Pycnonotus jocosus) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 38(4):146–149. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_38-4_p146.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Bruce H. Anderson, and Harry P. Robinson. 2010. Third record of the Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) in Florida, with comments on other recent records. Florida Field Naturalist 38(3):93–98. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_38-3_p093.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2010. Hairy Woodpeckers feed Downy Woodpecker nestlings. Florida Field Naturalist 38(2):71–72. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_38-2_p071.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Daria Feinstein, and Karen Lee. 2010. Natural history of Blue-and-yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna) in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 38(2):55–62. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_38-2_p055.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Arthur Wilson. 2010. First breeding record of the Bronzed Cowbird (Molothrus aeneus) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 38(1):1–7. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_38-1_p001.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2009. Nesting substrates of Monk Parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 37(2):51–57. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_37-2_p051.pdf

Gray, Paul N., Bill Pranty, Gregory R. Schrott, and James W. Tucker. 2009. Shorebird and larid use of mudflats at Lake Okeechobee, Florida, during drought conditions. Florida Field Naturalist 37(2):33–44. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_37-2_p033.pdf

Bankert, Andy, Bruce H. Anderson, and Bill Pranty. 2009. First record of the Townsend’s Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi) for Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 37(1):16–21. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_37-1_p016.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Dean W. Riemer, and Dorcas Fitzsimmons. 2008. First verifiable records of the Swallow-tailed Kite in Florida during winter. Florida Field Naturalist 36(4):92–93. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_36-4_p092.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2008. Corrected dates of occurrence for Florida’s third accepted report of the Cuban Pewee. Florida Field Naturalist 36(3):60–61. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_36-3_p060.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2008. The Ringed Turtle-Dove on Christmas Bird Counts in Florida: Cases of “boom and bust” and mistaken identity. American Birds 62:30–35.

Pranty, Bill, editor. 2008. Bald Eagle Management Plan (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Tallahassee, Florida. xiii + 60 pages.

Pranty, Bill. Status and distribution of Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) in Florida. 2007. North American Birds 61(4):658–665. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v061n04/p00658-p00665.pdf

Pranty, Bill. Records of Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus) in Florida. 2007. North American Birds 61(4):656–657. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v061n04/p00656-p00657.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2007. First record of the White Wagtail in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 35(4):119–123. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_35-4_p119.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Gianfranco D. Basili. 2007. First record of the Greater Flamingo for northeastern Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 35(4):114–118. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_35-4_p114.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Kurt Radamaker, Harold Weatherman, and Harry P. Robinson. 2007. First verifiable records of the Rough-legged Hawk in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 35(2):43–45. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_35-2_p043.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Andrew W. Kratter, and Reed Bowman. 2005. Records of the Bullock’s Oriole in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 33(2):41–46. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_33-2p41-46Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Tom Hince, and Mark Berney. 2005. First verifiable records of Blue-winged Warbler and Magnolia Warbler wintering in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 33(1):17–19. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_33-1p17-19Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Helen W. Lovell. 2004. Population increase and range expansion of Black-hooded Parakeets in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 32(4):129–137. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_32-4p129-137Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2004. Florida’s exotic avifauna, a preliminary checklist. Birding 36(4):362–372.

Pranty, Bill, Ed Kwater, Harold Weatherman, and Harry P. Robinson. 2004. The Eurasian Kestrel in Florida: First record for the southeastern United States, with a review of its status in North America. North American Birds 58(1):168–169. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v058n01/p00168-p00169.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Donald J. Robinson, Mary Barnwell, Clay Black, and Ken Tracey. 2004. Discovery and habitat use of Black Rails along the central Florida Gulf coast. Florida Field Naturalist 32(2):51–55. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_32-2p51-55Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Paul, Richard T., Bill Pranty, Ann F. Paul, Ann Hodgson, and David J. Powell. 2003. Probable hybridization between Elegant Tern and Sandwich Tern in west-central Florida: The first confirmed North American nesting record of Elegant Tern away from the Pacific Coast. North American Birds 57(2):280–282. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v057n02/p00280-p00282.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Howard Voren. 2003. Variation and possible hybridization of Brotogeris parakeets at Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Birding 35(3):262–266.

Pranty, Bill, and Kimball L. Garrett. 2003. The parrot fauna of the ABA Area: A current look. Birding 35(3):248–261.

Pranty, Bill, John H. Boyd, III, and Kurt Radamaker. 2003. Recent winter records of the Black-throated Blue Warbler in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 31(1):4–5. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_31-1p4-5Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Susan Epps. 2002. Distribution, population status, and documentation of exotic parrots in Broward County, Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 30(4):111–131. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_30-4p111-131Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Delany, Michael F., Stephen B. Linda, Bill Pranty, and Dustin W. Perkins. 2002. Density and reproductive success of Florida Grasshopper Sparrows in relation to time post-burn. Journal of Range Management 55(4):336–340.

Pranty, Bill. 2002. The use of Christmas Bird Count data to monitor populations of exotic birds. American Birds [56]:24–28.

Pranty, Bill. 2002. Red-shouldered Hawk feeds on carrion. Journal of Raptor Research 36(2):152–153.

Pranty, Bill, Gianfranco D. Basili, and Harry P. Robinson. 2002. First breeding record of the Dickcissel in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 30(2):36–39. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_30-2p36-39Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2001. The Budgerigar in Florida: Rise and fall of an exotic psittacid. North American Birds 55(4):389–397. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v055n04/p00389-p00397.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and P. William Smith. 2001. Status, distribution, and taxonomy of the spindalis complex (“Stripe-headed Tanager”) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 29(1):13–25. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_29-1p13-25Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2000. Possible anywhere: Shiny Cowbird. Birding 32(6):514–526.

Pranty, Bill. 2000. Record of a Black-throated Green Warbler wintering in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 28(4):186–188. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_28-4p186-188Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Delany, Michael F., Timothy Lockley, Bill Pranty, and Mark D. Scheuerell. 2000. Stomach contents of two nestling Florida Grasshopper Sparrows. Florida Field Naturalist 28(2):75–77. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_28-2p75-77Delany%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Glen E. Woolfenden. 2000. First record of the Northern Lapwing in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 28(2):53–56.https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_28-2p53-56Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2000. Three sources of Florida Grasshopper Sparrow mortality. Florida Field Naturalist 28(1):27–29. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_28-1p27-29Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Kim Schnitzius, Kevin Schnitzius, and Helen W. Lovell. 2000. Discovery, distribution, and origin of the Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 28(1):1–11. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_28-1p1-11Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Gian Basili. 1999. Zellwood, birds, and the ghosts of banned pesticides. Florida Naturalist 72(3):10–13.

Pranty, Bill. 1999. The next new ABA birds: Florida and the southeastern Gulf Coast. Birding 31(3):245–252.

Delany, Michael F., Patrick B. Walsh, Bill Pranty, and Dustin W. Perkins. 1999. A previously unknown population of Florida Grasshopper Sparrows on Avon Park Air Force Range. Florida Field Naturalist 27(2):52–56. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_27-2p52-56Delany%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Gianfranco D. Basili. 1998. Bird use of agricultural fields at Lake Apopka, Florida, with recommendations for the management of migratory shorebirds and other species. Florida Audubon Society. Winter Park, Florida. iii + 30 pages.

Pranty, Bill, and Michael A. McMillian. 1997. Status of the White-tailed Kite in northern and central Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 25(4):117–127. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_25-4p117-127Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

McMillian, Michael A., and Bill Pranty. 1997. Recent nesting of the White-tailed Kite in central Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 25:143–145. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_25-4p143-145McMillian%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Mark D. Scheuerell. 1997. First summer record of the Henslow’s Sparrow in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 25(2):64–66. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_25-2p64-66Pranty%2520-%2520FOC%252028%5B1%5D.pdf

Woolfenden, Glen E., Bill Pranty, John W. Fitzpatrick, and Brian S. Nelson. 1996. Western Wood-Pewee recorded in Highlands County, Florida. Florida Field Naturalist 24(3):61–67. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_24-3p61-67Woolfenden%5B1%5D.pdf

Woolfenden, Glen E., William B. Robertson, Jr., and Bill Prant[y]. 1996. Comparing the species lists in two recent books on Florida birds. Florida Field Naturalist 24(1):10–14. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_24-1p10-14Woolfenden%5B1%5D.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 1995. Tool use by Brown-headed Nuthatches in two Florida slash pine forests. Florida Field Naturalist 23(2):33–34. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_23-2p33-34Pranty%5B1%5D.pdf

Woolfenden, Glen E., Bill Pranty, and R. David Goodwin. 1994. North Pinellas Christmas Bird Count, 1985. Florida Field Naturalist 22(3):83–84. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/FFN_22-3p83-84Woolfenden%5B1%5D.pdf

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

Pranty, Bill, Jessie Barry, Jon L. Dunn, Kimball L. Garrett, Daniel D. Gibson, Tom Johnson, Aaron Lang, Mark W. Lockwood. Ron Pittaway, Peter Pyle, and David A. Sibley. 2015. 26th report of the ABA Checklist Committee, 2015. Birding 47(6):26–33.

Pranty, B. 2015. Further thoughts on the Hooded Crane. Birding 47(6):22–24.

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Kimball L. Garrett, Daniel D. Gibson, Marshall J. Iliff, Mark W. Lockwood. Ron Pittaway, and David A. Sibley. 2014. 25th report of the ABA Checklist Committee, 2013. Birding 46(6):24–33. https://www.aba.org/themencode-pdf-viewer/?file=https://www.aba.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ccr2013.pdf

Pranty, Bill, and Ted Floyd. 2013. The ABA Checklist Committee in the 21st century: Challenges and opportunities in the digital age. Birder’s Guide to Listing and Taxonomy 1(2):36–49, plus online material “Growth of the ABA Checklist,” pages 65–70.

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Kimball L. Garrett, Daniel D. Gibson, Marshall J. Iliff, Mark W. Lockwood. Ron Pittaway, and David A. Sibley. 2013. 24th report of the ABA Checklist Committee, 2013. Birding 45(6):30–37, plus online material “Taxonomic and nomenclatorial changes affecting the ABA Checklist,” pages 75–79.

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Daniel D. Gibson, Marshall J. Iliff, Paul E. Lehman, Mark W. Lockwood, Ron Pittaway, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2011. 22nd report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2011. Birding 43(6):26–33. https://www.aba.org/themencode-pdf-viewer/?file=https://www.aba.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ccr2011.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Daniel D. Gibson, Marshall J. Iliff, Paul E. Lehman, Mark W. Lockwood, Ron Pittaway, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2010. 21st report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2009–2010. Birding 42(6):30–39. https://www.aba.org/themencode-pdf-viewer/?file=https://www.aba.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ccr2010.pdf

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Steven C. Heinl, Andrew W. Kratter, Paul E. Lehman, Mark W. Lockwood, Bruce Mactavish, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2009. Annual report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2008–2009. Birding 41(6):38–43.

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Steven C. Heinl, Andrew W. Kratter, Paul E. Lehman, Mark W. Lockwood, Bruce Mactavish, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2008. Annual report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2007–2008. Birding 40(6):32–38.

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Steven C. Heinl, Andrew W. Kratter, Paul E. Lehman, Mark W. Lockwood, Bruce Mactavish, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2007. Annual report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2007. Birding 39(6):24–31. https://www.aba.org/themencode-pdf-viewer/?file=https://www.aba.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ccr2007.pdf

Pranty, Bill.2007. More on the ABA Checklist Committee. Birding 39(4):22–26.

Pranty, Bill. 2007. Lurkers and deceivers [March–April 2007 photo quiz answers]. Birding 39(3):62–66.

Pranty, Bill, Jon L. Dunn, Steve Heinl, Andrew W. Kratter, Paul Lehman, Mark W. Lockwood, Bruce Mactavish, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2006. Annual report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2006. Birding 38(6):20–24. https://www.aba.org/themencode-pdf-viewer/?file=https://www.aba.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ccr2006.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2006. Inside the ABA Checklist Committee: Who, what, and why. Birding 38(4):20–22.

Pranty, Bill. 2006. In memoriam: Richard Tompkins Paul. North American Birds 60(1):27. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v060n01/p00027-p00027.pdf

Robbins, Mark B., Steve Heinl, Andrew W. Kratter, Greg Lasley, Paul Lehman, Bruce Mactavish, Bill Pranty, and Kevin J. Zimmer. 2006. 2005 ABA Checklist Report. Birding 38(1):22–25. https://www.aba.org/themencode-pdf-viewer/?file=https://www.aba.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ccr2005.pdf

Pranty, Bill. 2004. State of the Region [Florida birds conservation summary]. North American Birds 58(4):517–518. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v058n04/p00515-p00518.pdf

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