Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

jcabbott

Fecha

Mayo 30, 2019 12:12 PM CDT

Descripción

Bee-like Robber Fly (Laphria grossa) flying
UNITED STATES: Alabama, Perry Co.
Perry Lakes Park off Hwy 175
Marion
30.May.2019
John C. Abbott JCA#3176

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

simonsr35

Fecha

Febrero 2022

Descripción

Found in an underwater cavern, photographed, and then released back to where it came from. Five golden colored eggs are visible in some of the photos.

This blind species is endemic to the underwater caves and caverns of the Floridan Aquifer in north-central Florida. It typically hangs upside down from the ceilings of these underwater passages.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

gldearman

Fecha

Junio 12, 2019 10:06 PM EDT

Descripción

Observed after dark sleeping on tall vegetation in unused pasture.

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Autor

marykeim

Fecha

Noviembre 2021

Descripción

Orlando Wetlands Park, Orange County, FL, November 2021.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

scottsimmons

Fecha

Octubre 17, 2021 10:42 AM HST

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Autor

rorywills

Fecha

Julio 22, 2021 07:40 AM EDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

brm85

Fecha

Octubre 7, 2019 10:26 AM EDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

brettmoyer

Fecha

Septiembre 18, 2020 04:20 PM EDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

noaboa

Fecha

Agosto 23, 2021 11:55 AM EDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Agosto 22, 2021 10:24 AM EDT

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Autor

myelaphus

Fecha

Abril 30, 2017 10:13 AM EDT

Descripción

With Holopogon as prey

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

cfabian

Fecha

Mayo 2021

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

morten

Fecha

Febrero 12, 2015 06:29 AM CET

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

gcochrane13

Fecha

Marzo 13, 2021 06:37 AM SAST

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Enero 4, 2021 09:14 AM EST

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

tomfeild

Fecha

Febrero 10, 2021 09:31 AM EST

Descripción

On sand on edge of mature Sand Pine stand.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

bradmoon

Fecha

Junio 11, 2020 03:21 PM CDT

Descripción

Male and female Promachus quadratus. In the photos here, the P. quadratus are for this observation. The comparison photos of P. bastardii (on the right side of each comparison) are from other observations farther inland in Louisiana (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/18569834, https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/19356761, and https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/51155008).

Promachus quadratus and P. bastardii are challenging to distinguish from one another. Hine (1911) studied specimens of P. quadratus from this area (Cameron Parish, Louisiana) and noted that they can be distinguished from P. bastardii by the overall lighter color (vs. darker brown in P. bastardii), smaller black area on top of each abdominal segment and larger light posterior margin of each segment (vs. larger dark areas and smaller light areas in P. bastardii), mostly yellow hairs on the palpi adjacent to proboscis (vs. black hairs in P. bastardii), and wings that are clearer (vs. browner in P. bastardii) with gray shading in the first submarginal cell that is much narrower than the cell (distinct gray shadow up to about 1/4 as wide as the cell vs. gray shadow that is about 1/2 as wide as the cell at the widest part in P. bastardii). Dave Patton also showed this narrow submarginal shading close-up in specimens from the same area as this observation (see https://bugguide.net/node/view/1692599 and https://bugguide.net/node/view/1692608). The darker color of P. bastardii also makes the long light hairs at the posterior margin of each abdominal segment stand out in higher contrast to the background color, whereas in P. quadratus there is much less contrast in those colors.

Bromley (1934) named the essentially identical robber flies in east Texas as a distinct species, Promachus texanus, and noted that they were often identified as P. quadratus. He also called into question whether P. quadratus was truly distinct from P. bastardii, but without pointing to any features or providing any evidence or citations to support that statement. As far as I can tell from the original descriptions as well as Hine's 1911 study, Bromley (1934) only described one subtle feature that differed between P. texanus and P. quadratus, which was that the halteres are black in P. texanus (vs. brown in P. quadratus according to the original description by Weidemann, 1828). So, unless I'm missing something in the literature (always a possibility because I'm not an expert in robber flies or taxonomy!), it appears to me that P. texanus isn't distinct from P. quadratus, and therefore that the name Promachus quadratus should have priority over Promachus texanus, at least until additional evidence is published demonstrating that P. texanus is in fact distinct from P. quadratus.

These photos also show other differences between P. quadratus and P. bastardii, such as light hairs with dark bristles on the posterior scutum and scutellum, light proximal and distal metatarsi with dark in between on the middle leg, light outer tibia on the hind leg, and light hairs under the abdomen in P. quadratus (vs. all darker in P. bastardii). Hine didn't mention these differences, and I haven't seen enough specimens to know if they are consistent or variable.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

giffbeaton

Fecha

Mayo 15, 2019 09:23 AM EDT

Descripción

On the outside of a Gopher Tortoise burrow

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

patrich

Fecha

Enero 1, 2018