Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

mande010

Fecha

Mayo 13, 2021 a las 08:39 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

mande010

Fecha

Mayo 13, 2021 a las 08:41 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 2021

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

mande010

Fecha

Abril 18, 2021 a las 10:24 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Águila Cabeza Blanca (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

Fecha

Abril 12, 2021 a las 02:39 AM PDT

Lugar

WA, US (Google, OSM)

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Búho Sabanero (Asio flammeus)

Fecha

Abril 6, 2021 a las 10:57 AM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 2021

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Autillo Elegante (Otus elegans)

Autor

asimov0803

Fecha

Agosto 2020

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

asimov0803

Fecha

Agosto 15, 2019 a las 01:16 AM UTC

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 2021

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 2021

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 27, 2021 a las 11:56 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 20, 2021 a las 09:10 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Rascón de Okinawa (Gallirallus okinawae)

Fecha

Marzo 2021

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 15, 2021 a las 11:03 AM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Febrero 19, 2021 a las 11:00 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Febrero 2021

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Noviembre 2020

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Julio 18, 2020 a las 10:30 AM JST

Descripción

Hime Habu

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Mariposa Cometa Oriental (Papilio glaucus)

Autor

molanic

Fecha

Agosto 2018

Descripción

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Chorlo Tildío (Charadrius vociferus)

Fecha

Junio 2, 2012 a las 05:13 PM CDT

Descripción

their famous "Broken Wing" act.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Araña Saltarina de Adanson (Hasarius adansoni)

Autor

sable

Fecha

Mayo 27, 2020 a las 08:14 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

sable

Fecha

Septiembre 13, 2020 a las 12:13 PM JST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Leopardo Africano (Panthera pardus ssp. pardus)

Autor

roelofvdb

Fecha

Enero 2016

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Jaguar (Panthera onca)

Autor

greglasley

Fecha

Agosto 2017

Descripción

On August 16, we witnessed what has to rank with one of the most incredible wildlife experiences I’ve ever had. Cheryl and I were on a trip with 6 other nature photographers and our leader. We had been in the Pantanal area of Brazil for about a week with 5 days along the Cuiaba River near Porto Jofre, looking for Jaguars and other photo ops. Our daily routine was breakfast at 5:30 AM and we took off on boats from 6 till about 11AM, lunch at noon at the lodge, then on the boats again 3PM till dark. Our group has 3 boats so just 3 people per boat so plenty of room for photo gear, etc. Over several days we had seen 10-12 Jaguars. Some were very good photo ops, some poor photo ops, some just glimpsed.

There are several lodges in the area and it is a popular place to visit for folks hoping to see Jaguars, so much like Yellowstone National Park, a crowd can gather when some significant wildlife is seen, but instead of car jams to see a Grizzly such as Yellowstone, this can be boat jams for a jaguar. I have seen as many as 22 boats, 70-100 feet off shore with lots of people in each boat taking photos of a sleeping Jaguar. BUT…that is not the end of the story! We were often in more remote areas of the rivers and inlets and streams more or less on our own looking for birds, etc., so lots of times there are no other boats around. The boat drivers all have radios, so if a Jaguar is seen, other boats are informed. We move 20-25 miles up and down the river to explore, so many times other boats are not close enough to arrive while a Jaguar is in view.

My limited Jaguar experience is that some are just sleeping and/or resting and mostly ignore the boats in the river. Others are walking though the edge of the forest near the river and when a boat becomes visible, the animal just vanishes back into the forest. This morning at about 7:30 AM our three boats were in an out-of-the way location, a mile or so apart. The boat I was in was photographing a Great Black Hawk when one of our other boats called us on the radio to say they had a Jaguar swimming in the river, apparently hunting, so we headed to that area. Apparently the Jaguar, with just its head visible, swam up to loafing Yacare Caimans and pounced onto a caiman which was about 6 or so feet long. The Jaguar and the caiman thrashed in the water with the Jaguar biting into the skull of the caiman. That is about the time our boat arrived, after the Jaguar had mostly subdued the caiman, but the caiman was still thrashing about. The Jaguar was up against a high dirt bank, still mostly in the water with a firm grip on the skull of the caiman and the Jaguar was not letting go. It was very dark and under heavy foliage and vines so I was shooting at 4000 and 6400 ISO but that was my only choice. Eventually the Jaguar was able to work itself and its prize away from the vines and it drug the caiman out of the water and up the dirt bank and eventually back into the forest to enjoy its catch beyond the curious and amazed eyes of the human observers. The caiman was as large or larger than the Jaguar. All I have to say is that a mature Jaguar is an incredibly powerful predator and watching this whole 15 minute episode is something I’ll not forget. What a beast!

This entire series was shot from a boat, perhaps 40 feet off the bank with a Canon EOS 7D Mark II and a Canon 100-400 IS lens in case anyone is interested.

Cuiaba River,
near Porto Jofre,
Pantanal,
Brazil
16 August 2017