February 19th

At 12 pm yesterday I headed out on the Burlington Bike Path, next to Starr Farm Road. It was a bit overcast, very windy and around 25 degrees Fahrenheit. We didn't see many birds on the water, as the bay was frozen, however through my binoculars I could see the black and white markings of two Common Goldeneye bobbing on the water, and both disappeared into the water for a minute or so at a time before coming back up.

On the bike path we noticed one or two Black-capped Chickadees in the northern whitecedar on the side of the road, and we played a chickadee mobbing call in an attempt to get more to come out. The result was at least 10 chickadees flying back and forth across the path, calling and joining in the mobbing. Two Tufted Titmice also joined in, and after about five minutes some Red-breasted Nuthatches flew in. First they stayed farther away on the taller canopy trees, but after a bit they flew closer and joined the other birds in the shrub right next to the bike path. It was an exciting site to see, and I was able to distinguish each species' unique calls. Between the calls, the closeness of the birds and my binoculars I was completely confident in my identification of the species.

After leaving the bike path we drove further down to the Sewage Treatment Plant further down on North Ave, past Flynn Elementary. Michael had recommended the spot for waterfowl, however I misunderstood him and thought he meant the natural area behind the plant. We didn't see any bird species here, though we did stumble upon a very old, abandoned car that had some type of nest in what used to be the hood of the car. I didn't have a camera on me, so I couldn't take a picture. I'm hoping to revisit this site in the next week or so to take a picture of the nest to post on iNaturalist for identification, as well as to check out the ponds at the sewage treatment center, as when I clarified with Michael where he meant after our excursion, he pointed out the exact location on a map.

I was hoping to see more species in the two hours we were out, however I am looking forward to my next field experience, especially for seeing some more waterfowl.

Publicado el 20 de febrero de 2016 a las 05:44 PM por kirsticarr kirsticarr

Observaciones

Fotos / Sonidos

No hay fotos o sonidos

Qué

Carbonero de Capucha Negra (Poecile atricapillus)

Autor

kirsticarr

Fecha

Febrero 19, 2016 a las 12:00 PM EST

Descripción

A group flew in after hearing mobbing calls, surrounding either side of the bike path.

Fotos / Sonidos

No hay fotos o sonidos

Qué

Carbonero Copetón (Baeolophus bicolor)

Autor

kirsticarr

Fecha

Febrero 19, 2016 a las 12:00 PM EST

Descripción

Two flew in, in response to the mobbing calls. Clearly tufted head, characteristic call, and light gray coloring.

Fotos / Sonidos

No hay fotos o sonidos

Qué

Bajapalos Pecho Canela (Sitta canadensis)

Autor

kirsticarr

Fecha

Febrero 19, 2016 a las 12:00 PM EST

Descripción

Two flew in after hearing the mobbing calls. The rusty breast made it clear it was Red-breasted, however one was a bit paler, possibly female. Black head and white strap, and was hopping up and down the tree in the characteristic "nuthatch" way.

Fotos / Sonidos

No hay fotos o sonidos

Qué

Gaviota Pico Anillado (Larus delawarensis)

Autor

kirsticarr

Fecha

Febrero 19, 2016 a las 12:30 PM EST

Descripción

Flying overhead, near the shore.

Fotos / Sonidos

No hay fotos o sonidos

Qué

Pato Chillón (Bucephala clangula)

Autor

kirsticarr

Fecha

Febrero 19, 2016 a las 12:00 PM EST

Descripción

Diving in the water, far out past the frozen ice. Clear black and white markings, and diving completely into the water. It was far away so difficult to see, but the markings were apparent.

Comentarios

Thanks for the entry!
Remember to add your observations to it! :)
Sean

Anotado por sebeckett hace cerca de 8 años

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