Diario del proyecto Invasive alien species – Geopark Karawanken-Karavanke

22 de julio de 2024

Hello there!

We're part of the HUMANITA EU project, and we're on a mission to learn more about nature by identifying non-native invasive alien species in the Karawanken-Karavanke UNESCO Global Geopark. We'd love your help through the Citizen Science approach to gather data and protect nature and habitats.

Our main goal is to gather information about non-native plant species that have made their way into the habitats of native plants. We're particularly interested in 10 common non-native species, including Annual Fleabane (Erigeron annuus), Japanese Knotweed (Reynoutria japonica), Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera), Canada Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis) and Giant Goldenrod (Solidago gigantea), Large-leaved Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus), Common Evening-Primrose (Oenothera biennis), Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), Orange Day-Lily (Hemerocallis fulva) and Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina).

We understand that not all non-native species are invasive, but we want to address the threat posed by invasive species to native habitats. In our region, there are about 500 non-native plant species, and for every third indigenous plant species, one non-native species has emerged, presenting challenges in the natural environment by displacing indigenous species.

We'd appreciate your help in identifying locations where non-native invasive species are present, whether they've been discarded as green cuttings and found their way back into the wild, or have spread due to other factors. Your assistance in this endeavour would be fantastic, and we wish you a successful hunt for relevant data. Thanks a lot!

Publicado el 22 de julio de 2024 a las 06:18 PM por uroshgrabner uroshgrabner | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

11 de julio de 2024

Giant Goldenrod (Solidago gigantea)

A related species of plant: Canada Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis)

Origin:
North America.

Location:
It typically thrives in open, sunny habitats such as prairies, meadows, and road or railroad sides, construction sites preferring well-drained soils.

Influence:
This perennial plant has two strategies for distribute which are dangerous for native species: 1) by large flyable seed stock (up to 15,000 seeds/plant); 2) from small fragments steams which underground produce roots and shoots. Its rapid growth and dense stands decrease species richness and diversity.

Recognition:
Giant goldenrod features tall, erect stems reaching heights of up to 2.5 meters, adorned with narrow, lance-shaped leaves arranged alternately along the stem. In late summer and early fall, the plant produces clusters of bright yellow flowers arranged in elongated, branching inflorescences.


Foto: Urosh Grabner

Publicado el 11 de julio de 2024 a las 06:31 AM por prreiter prreiter | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)

Origin:
North America. It is a popular forest tree due to its fast-growing abilities.

Location:
Black locust grows in a place with sun exposure and thrive on sandy soils. It can be found on old pastures and fields, forest edges or floodplains.

Influence:
Black locusts form colonies due to the airborne seeds which can be transported up to 100m. Moreover, together with leaves, bark and shoots are toxic and can be a threat for livestock, especially horses. Leaves of the tree contain nitrogen which is transferred to the ground when they fall and can lead to the establishment of other weedy species.

Recognition:
It can grow up to 30 meters with an oval-shaped crown. Its branches have 1 cm long thorns and white flower clusters blossoming in mid-to-late spring. Each leaf is composed of 7-19 leaflets of oval shape and a small notch at the tip. Fruit of Black locusts are dark brown clusters of pods containing 4-10 seeds each.


Foto: Urosh Grabner

Publicado el 11 de julio de 2024 a las 06:31 AM por prreiter prreiter | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Large-leaved Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus)

Origin:
Western United States and Canada. Introduced to Europe to improve the soil on roadsides and in coniferous forests and as an ornamental plant (19th/20th century).

Location:
Bigleaf Lupine can be found from low to middle elevations in open and moist habitats. It prefers well-drained soils and often grows along roadsides, riverbanks, and in disturbed areas.

Influence:
The species has a strong impact on alpine mountain hay meadow communities because it changes the structure of usually low-growing vegetation. In its introduced range Bigleaf Lupine suppresses local plants and reduces the abundance of butterfly species.

Recognition:
Bigleaf Lupine’s steam is upright, unbranched and can grow up to 1.5m. Its flowers are purple or purple-blue and have a pea-like shape. Bigleaf Lupine has long-stalked basal leaves which are composed of 10-17 leaflets and can grow up to 25 cm in diameter.


Foto: Urosh Grabner

Publicado el 11 de julio de 2024 a las 06:31 AM por prreiter prreiter | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Japanese Knotweed (Reynoutria japonica)

A related species of plant:
Bohemian Knotweed (Reynoutria × bohemica) and Giant Knotweed (Reynoutria sachalinensis)

Origin:
Japan. It was introduced in Europe in the 19th century as an ornamental plant.

Location:
Japanese knotweed can grow in different habitats for example: wetlands, roadsides or ditches.

Influence:
Japanese knotweed forms dense monocultures which can reduce sunlight penetration and prevent native species from growing. It can also regrow from small fragments of steam which underground produce roots and shoots enabling the plant to spread easily. This species has been observed to damage human infrastructure by growing through concrete/asphalt cracks.

Recognition:
Steams of Japanese knotweed are hollow, and smooth in purple or green colour. The plant can reach up to 4 meters each growing season and grow 10 to 30 cm per day. Flowers are small, white or cream and growing in clusters. Leaves have a heart flattened at the base shape and alternated along the stem in a distinctive zigzag pattern. Young shoots and leaves of Japanese knotweed can be eaten.


Foto: Urosh Grabner

Publicado el 11 de julio de 2024 a las 06:30 AM por prreiter prreiter | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

03 de julio de 2024

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera)

Origin:
Himalayas. It was introduced in Europe in the 19th century as an ornamental plant.

Location:
Himalayan balsam likes moist and relatively nutrient-rich habitats. For this reason, it can be found on river banks, woodlands, roadsides or forest edges.

Influence:
This annual plant grows in dense stands which causes shading out and crowding out native species. It reproduces by seed dispersal (up to 2000/plant) which can be ejected ca. 7m from fruit and seeds can be washed out in streams and rivers. When growing on riverbanks, plants can increase soil erosion in winter, as their shallow root systems fail to stabilize the ground after they die. Due to big nectar production, Himalayan balsam is more attractive to pollinating insects than native plants which can cause a lack of pollination for them.

Recognition:
The plant grows typically up to 3 m high. Flowers have a hooded shape and are pink, white or purple. Inflorescences grow in groups of 2-14 flowers. Stems are reddish or green, branched and hairless. Leaves can reach 5-23 cm in length and when crushed have a strong musty smell. The seeds of Himalayan balsam are eatable and taste like nuts.

Drüsiges Springkraut

Photo: Urosh Grabner

Publicado el 03 de julio de 2024 a las 01:48 PM por liliasch liliasch | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

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